“Common Ground in Eco-Christianity and Eco-Buddhism” by Stephen Hastings, Boston University School of Theology

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Buddhist environmentalist Ian Harris holds that “the emergence of eco-religiosity, a specifically religious concern for the environment, has manifest[ed] itself as a significant theme in the major religions of the late twentieth-century” (Harris, 1990). The purpose of this paper is to reveal common ground between Buddhism and Christianity that can promote healthy dialogue and mutual action to address the present ecological crisis. I have found that the Christian version of “eco-religiosity” can be summarized by three terms: 1) relatedness; 2) responsibility; and 3) redemption. After defining and offering support for these terms, I apply them to a number of Buddhist writings and demonstrate how they offer a common language that provides both ontological and material underpinnings for Buddhist and Christian environmental awareness and ethics. In doing so, I demonstrate that at least two ‘major religions’ find themselves engaged in this common and global context of ecological crisis and reach similar, constructive conclusions.

Read the entire article here.

One Response to ““Common Ground in Eco-Christianity and Eco-Buddhism” by Stephen Hastings, Boston University School of Theology”

  1. Josh Stanton says:

    It seems that there may be a growing thread of eco-Judaism, as well. Take for example the COEJL, http://www.coejl.org/index.php.

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