“Uncapping the Springs of Localization: Christian Inculturation in South India in the 19th and 20th Centuries,” by M. Christhu Doss

Identified for its diversified culture and traditions, India witnessed a process of assimilation and synthesis of cultures during the Indian subcontinent’s medieval period. Undoubtedly, however, the advent of British colonialism during the seventeenth century profoundly altered Indian life, culture, and polity. Ancient Indian customs and values were undermined by the conquering forces, and “Hindu” practices were decried as being superstitious. Consequently, the scathing attack on Indian culture and religion generated vehement criticism from English educated Indian intelligentsia including Ram Mohan Roy, who even alleged that “the British did not want the light of knowledge to dawn on India.”

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  1. […] the full article by M. Christhu Doss in the Journal of Inter-Religious Dialogue's Seventh Issue, please click here. Share […]

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